Virginia Tech®home

Searchable Database

Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Opportunities

  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Nondestructive Inspection at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Acoustooptic Nondestructive Inspection Project Overview The Acousto-optic Nondestructive Inspection (AONDI) system functions by categorizing the scattering of acoustic waves via an interferometric scan in order to create a map of subsurface flaws and defects in the test specimen. Currently, the main objective is to develop a DC interferometric probe system and drive a wave by the ‘pitch-catch’ method for the purpose of nondestructive inspection. This research is relevant to engineers and scholars alike and has the potential to streamline safety for flight applications and alter the way that post production materials testing is performed. Objectives Demonstrate Optical Interferometer Demonstrate ability to launch surface waves in an aluminum specimen Demonstrate data collection system Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Design interferometer cavity Refine optical pathway Demonstrate surface dependent fringe patterns Demonstrate surface wave launch using wedges Demonstrate surface wave capture Design optical collection hardware Assemble and validate data collection system General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Ultrasonic excitation and detection lead ultrasonic wave generation high-speed image acquisition Preferred Majors MSE ESM CpE EE ME AOE Phys Preferred Academic Years Looking for Sophomore/Junior level student  Preferred Skills and Interests Ultrasonic/acoustic wave propagation Optics Nondestructive inspection Material properties High speed imaging Electronics integration Data collection and analysis Design of experiment. How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing 
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Brain Control Interface at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Direct Brain Control Interfacing Project Overview OpenBCI is described as an open-source brain computer interface platform that seeks to distribute biosensing and neurosensing hardware at a low-cost. When paired with the service’s free-to-download Graphical User Interface (GUI), anyone with access to the hardware can analyze a live data stream of different brain waves and patterns from school, work, or the comfort of their own home. With this data, users can perform a variety of tasks, from implementing deep learning algorithms to control a bionic arm, to coding and playing a video game paired with software that predicts movement from the live stream of data Objectives Validate system hardware Design actuation system Demonstration actuation Spring proposal Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Validate system operation Design system hardware interface Design system software interface System build and validate Design system demonstration experiment Demonstrate system Draft spring proposal Manage and report General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Preferred Majors Preferred Academic Years Looking for first-year/Sophomore/Junior level students Preferred Skills and Interests Neuroscience BMES EE CpE Biology Psychology How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing 
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Natural Language Processing at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Natural Language Processing Project Overview Natural language processing (NLP) techniques can use machine learning to process large amounts of free response data into more easily digestible information, enabling researchers to rapidly collect meaningful feedback on services, processes, pedagogy and more. There exist many open-source packages written for multiple platforms that can be collected and integrated to serve a specific feedback purpose. The purpose of this research effort is to develop an integrated system that can support research in an academic environment to enable instructors or researchers to to collect and process large amounts of free-response written or transcribed data to inform and improve educational practices. Objectives Benchmark Current System Architecture and Function Determine User Requirements Revise Existing NLP System Develop a ‘Best-Practices’ Document Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Project Management Benchmark Current System Survey or Interview Faculty Process Faculty Preferences into Design Requirements Design Beta System Develop and Implement Beta System Beta System Validation Documentation General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Team lead Software designers Preferred Majors CS CpE EE CMDA Education Preferred Academic Years Looking for First-year/Sophomore/Junior level students Preferred Skills and Interests machine learning coding AI Teaching Pedagogy software design How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing 
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Machine Learning for Residential HVAC at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Machine Intelligence for the NEST Thermostat Project Overview The Nest thermostat is an intuitive thermostat that learns temperature settings through user input. This thermostat was designed to optimize the temperature control and make homes more efficient. However, we asked, what if we could make the Nest more intuitive? How could we expand the current capabilities of the Nest? The Nest is a smart device that solely uses user input to predict and set the temperature for the house at a certain time. It does not account for heat loss which occurs in any location with this thermostat, nor does it account for changes in temperature as the year passes on. So, the goal of this project is to create a system that can account for heat loss and provide the Nest with the ideal temperature needed to achieve optimal user comfort. Objectives Collect adequate data for model training Demonstrate refined classification model Demonstrate classification accuracy Develop alpha version predictive model Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Refine data collection hardware Deploy additional sensor nodes Revise data cleaning algorithms Develop and demonstrate system to validate model classification Complete next generation classification model training Implement voting algorithms for data disagreement Implement alpha version predictive model Develop predictive data collection systems General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Thermal data collection researcher.   Duties associated with hardware and software development for data collection, data preprocessing, data validation hardware and procedures. Preferred Majors ME CpE EE CS CEE Phys Preferred Academic Years Looking for Sophomore/Junior level students Preferred Skills and Interests heat flow residential HVAC mechanical design and assembly electrical design and assembly arduino/PI coding sensor deployment data collection data modeling How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing  
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Magnetothermal Heat Switch at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Gadolinium-Based Magnetothermal Heat Switch Project Overview Heat switches are devices that allow for manual or autonomous control of the amount of heat going into or out of a system. These systems are typically used in conjunction with a cooling system to remove heat from systems that have energy and heat sensitivities. The switch varies between being opened and closed to manage heat within the system. Ideally, these devices are infinitely conductive in the closed state and not conductive in the open state. Current heat switches are typically made of state-changing material (like paraffin wax), bimetal materials, or actuating solenoids. The goal of this project is to create an autonomous heat switch based on the second-order magnetic phase transition in gadolinium. Objectives Correlate empirical F(x,T) data with simulation Develop multi-physics model Develop alpha version of genetic algorithm for device design Develop alpha hardware design Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Gather empirical magnetic data Develop magnetic to thermal simulation interface code Align FEM with empirical data Develop genetic algorithm framework Develop initial hardware design Fabricate and validate alpha hardware  General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) FEM Model developer - develop Multiphysics model, generate simulated force curves, begin genetic algorithm framework development Preferred Majors CS MSE EE ME Phys Preferred Academic Years Looking for Sophomore/Junior level students Preferred Skills and Interests general coding genetic algorithms finite element method simulation magnetic materials, devices, and phenomena How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing 
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Sustainable Materials at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Undergraduate Research in Sustainable Materials Project Overview Humanity has an unsustainable relationship with our natural environment. There are multiple natural resources that are being consumed more rapidly than they can be replenished. Two such resources are peat moss and lumber. Peat grows in bogs at a rate of one inch every 15-25 years and is severely over harvested. Similarly, lumber harvested from old growth trees can require 25-50 year to regrow. Both of these products serve as important components of their biomes, and act as significant carbon sinks. There are no synthetic substitutes for peat, and commercially available synthetic lumber does not reproduce natural counterparts well. The goal of this research project is to identify a candidate natural product to begin the development of a synthetic fabrication process. Objectives 1. Select a candidate material system for synthetic reproduction 2. Develop an annotated bibliography around candidate material 3. Develop a proposed task plan for Spring 2023 Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Initial team building Initial background research on peat and lumber Down select to final material system Intermediate research on selected material system Proposal development Manage and report  General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Sustainable Materials Researcher Preferred Majors CNRE (specifically ERM, SBIO, FORS) ChemE Chem MSE EPP CALS CAUS COS  Preferred Academic Years Preferred Skills and Interests good communication, writing, and presentation skills literature research green engineering, sustainability, forestry, materials science, chemistry, woodworking, agriculture, farming, gardening How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing  
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Nonverbal Driver Communications at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Non-Verbal Driver Communication System Project Overview The goal of Courtesy Horn is to develop an alternative car horn system that increases the abilities of drivers to communicate with each other in a non-verbal manner. Car horns are currently loud, abrasive, and do not carry a significant amount of information. A courtesy horn will allow for more specific communication between drivers through variations in tone and volume. The goals of this project are to develop such a system while gauging the response of potential stakeholders to better determine what information is most important to communicate, and what tones best convey this information. Objectives Conduct and Analyze Human Factors Research Complete Beta System Design Prepare for Spring 2023 Testing Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. Get IRB approval (APPROVED) Recruit study participants Finalize alpha system build/validate Conduct human factors testing Analyze human factors test data Refine sound palette Beta system design Beta system build and validate Manage and report General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Electronics hardware designer Human factors test coordinator Sound palette designer Data analyzer Software designer Preferred Majors Majors: ME, EE, CpE, CS, Mgt, Psyc, STS, Sociology  Minor: HCI Preferred Academic Years Looking for first-year/Sophomore students Preferred Skills and Interests Electronics Automobiles human-computer interaction ergonomics social science communication human factors related data analyses How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing  
  • GrayUR Undergraduate Research for Credit - Autoplane at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 08/01/2022 Autoplane Project Overview Aerial surveying involves flying repeatedly over the area of interest while taking photographs. These photos can then be combined into a composite image and various post-processing techniques can be applied to highlight patterns and collect data. These surveys have the potential to increase safety and efficiency in a variety of fields, though their use is often limited by expensive equipment and software. The goal of AutoPlane is to overcome the cost and accessibility barriers associated with aerial surveying by designing a low-cost, autonomous air vehicle capable of flying survey missions and processing the collected images using freely available software. The drone will fly a grid pattern to survey areas of interest, and the images collected will be used to generate orthomosaic photos, slope models, and subsequently perform tree segmentation using computer algorithms. Potential applications of this data include evaluating the risk of forest fires, determining forest health, and monitoring invasive species. Objectives Fly MK IV Airframe Capture high-quality image data sets Demonstrate classification algorithm Secure new research partners Major Tasks The major tasks of the project are outlined below. These are nominal and are likely to change somewhat throughout the course of the year. These are meant to illustrate the general nature of the work that the position entails. MK.IV Preliminary Design and Budget MK.IV Airframe construction Flight Control Setup and Ground Testing Flight testing Crosstrain current and new members Optimize image collection to plan for algorithm development Implement semi autonomous waypoint missions Feature extraction using video processing Build and integrate stabilization rig for the onboard camera General Responsibilities of the Group Students participating in the GrayUR undergraduate research group will register for an ENGE 2994 or ENGE 4994 undergraduate research course. Typically, students enroll for a 1 credit-hour course load. Under certain circumstances, we can look at extending this up to as many as 3 credits per semester and can sometimes explore technical elective credit within your major. Though not required, the expectation is that you will continue on with the team for two semesters, though we will examine the relationship at the end of the fall semester. In addition to the major technical tasks listed above, all members of the GrayUR undergraduate research team should expect  To devote ~3 hours/week to research for each credit hour To attend a biweekly team meeting with Dr. Gray To attend a monthly all-hands meeting with Dr. Gray To participate in periodic reporting (symposia, research poster sessions, etc.) Major Deliverables All student teams will have the following deliverables One progress presentation to the entire GrayUR group each semester Final project reporting Final report Final slides Final personal reflection Open Positions Specific Role(s) Flight systems and airframe design Image processing and data analysis Preferred Majors ME AE EE CpE CS CEE Phys Preferred Academic Years Looking for Sophomore/Junior level students Preferred Skills and Interests airframe design drone flight automated flight programming mechanical design, fabrication/assembly, mechanical test sensor systems payload accommodation data collection procedure documentation How to Apply Applications will be reviewed by Dr. Gray and by continuing researchers on the team. After a review of the application, our team will contact candidates to schedule an interview (likely to be conducted via zoom). Review for the positions will begin on Bastille Day, 2022, and will continue until all positions are filled. Please send an email to Dr. David Gray (dagray3@vt.edu) with the following deliverables; A brief (~1 page) essay or cover letter explaining which of the projects you are interested in, and why you think you might be a good fit for that project (or those projects). If you are applying for multiple projects, extend your essay a little and describe your interest and qualifications for each position. Be sure to let us know your major and where you are in your academic career (sophomore, junior, etc.) A resume outlining your work experience and education Please reach out if you have any questions or concerns. Other Open Position Areas Sustainable Materials Nondestructive Inspection Magnetic Materials, Devices, and Phenomena Artificial Intelligence for HVAC Control Aerial Drone Surveillance and Image Processing Non-verbal Driver Communications System OpenBCI Brain Control Interface System Natural Language Processing  
  • Undergraduate Researcher for credit - High-order Harmonic generation from divalent atoms at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 12/30/2022 Dr. Turker Topcu at the Mathematics Department is looking for an undergraduate researcher for credit to work on high-order harmonic generation from excited states of a helium atom. It has been computationally demonstrated that in such systems, the high-order harmonic photon emission can dramatically increase. More intense broadband generated in this way can be used to compose more intense ultra-short pulses (such as attosecond pulses) to study/manipulate electronic motion inside atoms in real-time. This is a computational project, and the PI will provide existing codes. However, the student will need to modify some parts of the code as directed by the PI. The prospective student should have some experience in C/C++ programming and parallel computing. Previous exposure to quantum mechanics will be necessary. 
  • Undergraduate Researcher for credit - Rydberg atoms in optical lattices at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 12/30/2022 Dr. Turker Topcu at the Mathematics Department is looking for an undergraduate researcher for credit who will work on simulating time-dependent dynamics of Rydberg atoms trapped in optical lattices. Specifically, we will study multiphoton excitations between Ry states of opposite-field seeking character in optical lattices with wavelengths ranging from infrared to the microwave region. Multiphoton transitions between Ry states can be well simulated using classical physics, and we will focus on the classical phase space picture of the excitation dynamics by numerically solving the classical equations of motion. The PI will provide existing codes, however, the student will need to modify some parts of the code as directed by the PI. These codes will help us investigate the non-perturbative dynamics of Ry atoms in an optical lattice which can provide insight into how such processes can be used to improve quantum gate protocols in quantum information processing using neutral cold atoms.This is a computational project, and the prospective student should have some experience in C/C++ programming. Previous exposure to classical/quantum mechanics is helpful but not critically essential. 
  • Undergraduate Researcher (w/Credit) in Stem Cell and Rodent Disease Model at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 12/31/2030 Dr. He Lab at the College of Veterinary Medicine is looking for undergraduate student researcher with strong interests in the research projects associated with stem cell, biomaterials, and rodent models of cardiovascular diseases. Students with previous biological reserach experience and basic wet-lab skills (e.g., PCR, Western blot, cell culture, and/or rodent handling) are highly desired. Students should be self-motivated, and willing to learn new experimental skills and working individually and collaboratively in a friendly working environment. 
  • Undergraduate Researcher at Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Employer: Virginia Tech Office of Undergraduate Research Expires: 05/30/2023 The Terrestrial Robotics and Engineering Controls (TREC) Lab at Virginia Tech is looking for Undergraduate Students from ME, ECE, CPE, and CS interested in working on the numerous ongoing projects which include Humanoid Robots, Exoskeletons, Robotic Manipulation, and Autonomous Vehicles, just to mention a few. The lab will provide a collaborative environment where students from different disciplines will be working together towards a common goal and learning from each other. Working on any of these projects can result in credit hours toward Independent Studies, Undergraduate Research, or Senior Design Projects, depending upon the student's preference. Sophomore, Junior, and Senior students will be considered and project assignments will be tailored to the expertise already available, or that the student is seeking to develop.Interested applicants should send their CV to Dr. Leonessa at aleoness@vt.edu and use https://doodle.com/mm/alexanderleonessa/book-a-time to schedule an appointment.